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Study finds: A glass of milk a day could keep colon cancer at bay

by , 09 September 2013

Drink milk, it's a great way to keep your bones and teeth strong. That's what your mom's been telling you since you were little. Now, if studies are to be believed, milk could help you prevent colon cancer too.

It’s the third most common form of cancer out there – colon cancer (also called colorectal cancer).

And the scary part is as many as 95% of colon cancer sufferers show no genetic risk to the disease before they get it, reports Wikipedia.

So why, if there’s a natural way to fend of this type of cancer wouldn’t you take it?

Luckily for you, there is.

Milk – the new weapon in your colon cancer fighting arsenal

A study out of Sweden reveals there’s “a protein that exists in milk [that] can significantly reduce the rate at which colon cancer cells grow over time,” reports medicalnewstoday.com.

According to the study, the lactoferricin4-14 protein reduces the growth rate of colon cancer cells by prolonging the period of the cell cycle before chromosomes are replicated.

And that’s not all.

Dr Jonathan Wright, the natural health specialist behind Nutrition & Healing, has found another study that shows calcium significantly reduces your risk of colon cancer too. That’s because calcium stops the cells that line the intestinal tract from overgrowing and becoming cancerous,” adds healingwell.com.

So how much milk do you need to drink to reap these colon cancer fighting benefits

500ml of milk a day is all it take, reports BBC News.

So there you have it – if you’re worried about colon cancer, grab a glass of milk this evening and get at least 1,000mg of calcium per day and 4,000 IU of vitamin D. It’s an easy way to cut your colon cancer risk by as much as 12%.

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