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Analysis reveals which men are at highest risk of testicular cancer

by , 22 June 2017
Analysis reveals which men are at highest risk of testicular cancer
Results from an analysis published in Nature Genetics could help us understand which men are at the highest risk of developing testicular cancer and alert them to get screened for this easy-to-treat type of cancer….

The results reveal new genetic locations that could be susceptible to inherited testicular germ cell tumours. The scientists behind the analysis, from the Testicular Cancer Consortium (TECAC) worked with a number of top institutions to perform this probe and are very confident about their results. Keeping reading to find out all about them.

Germ cell tumours account for about 95% of testicular cancer cases

According to the scientists behind the study, testicular germ cells tumours are the most common cancer in the United States and Europe in white men between ages 20 and 39. They estimate that germ cell tumours make up for about 95% of testicular cancer cases.

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Analysis identifies new genetic locations that could be susceptible to testicular germ cell tumours

“With this analysis, we’ve identified eight new loci in previously unknown regions” said Katherine L Nathanson, a professor of Translational Medicine and Human Genetics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a member of Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. “We’ve also found four new loci in previously identified regions.”
 
Nathanson said that the identification of new genetic locations isn’t only a matter of statistical significance. Referencing new loci is also biologically relevant as it suggests that particular pathways are disrupted – especially those that are involved in the function, maturation and development of male germ cells.
 
“Even though this cancer is curable, it shows how much we still have to learn about this particular disease type,” Nathanson said. “These findings can guide us when trying to determine which patients are at a high risk of developing testicular cancer and who among them should be screened.”

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