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Why Xylitol-sweetened gum isn't good for everyone in your family

by , 29 July 2013

You probably know that xylitol can help you kick your sweet tooth habit, can help prevent cavities and can help protect you against ear and sinus infections. But what's good for you is most definitely not good for all your family members. Here's why exposing your dog to xylitol could be a fatal mistake.

You know all too well that pets can get into just about anything. Sometimes, it’s no big deal. But other times, it’s deadly. And you’d never think a pack of gum could do it.

Xylitol-sweetened gum could kill your dog!

Andrew Miller writes in Nutrition & Healing that he recently read a horrible story about a dog named Billy, who got into a bag of groceries and ate several packs of xylitol-sweetened gum.

According to Miller, as soon as Billy started showing symptoms - bleeding around his eyes and in his arm pit area -his owner rushed him to the vet.

But it was too late.

Billy was diagnosed with acute liver failure and was euthanised after five days of intensive care. His organs had failed and the damage was just too much.

“This owner’s heartbreak serves as a warning to the rest of us,” writes Miller.

While Billy ate a few packs of gum, dogs can get sick from eating even one piece!

So if you observe symptoms like vomiting, lethargy, loss of coordination, collapse and seizures in your dog, or if you suspect your dog has ingested something containing xylitol, get him to the vet right away.

Most importantly, keep products containing xylitol where your dogs can’t get to them.

It’s easy to throw a handbag or a shopping bag on the couch or on the floor and get to it later, but all it takes is a few minutes for a curious dog to become the centre of another tragic story like Billy’s.

Bottom line: Avoid tragedy by keeping xylitol sweetened gum away from your four-legged family members. .



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