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Two bleedingly obvious signs your child suffers from haemophilia…

by , 16 April 2013

If you bleed or bruise easily, you could have more in common with Abraham Lincoln than you think. Because these are the most common markers of haemophilia, which Lincoln suffered from. And as it's world haemophilia day tomorrow, Wednesday, 17 April, it's the perfect time to find out more about the blood clotting disorder.

 
More than 240,000 people globally have been diagnosed with haemophilia or other forms of inherited bleeding disease, says PRWire
 
If you have haemophilia, you’ll know that your blood doesn’t clot properly, which means you face a higher level of risk just by going about your daily life.
 
While you don’t bleed any faster than normal, you do bleed for longer and it takes longer for the bleeding to stop.
 
So if you’ve cut yourself and the bleeding doesn’t stop on its own, you’ll need to gently apply pressure with a clean cloth or bandage, says FSPHealth.
 
If the wound doesn’t heal, you’ll need to see your doctor about possible blood clotting disorders like haemophilia. 
 
There are two tell-tale signs that your child has inherited haemophilia…
 
You don’t even need to wait for a serious injury to diagnose haemophilia in your children.
 
If there’s a history of bleeding disorders in your family, all you need to watch for is bruising and blood loss when the teeth first cut through the gums, and inflammation and bruising around the joints caused by internal bleeding, says Medic8.com.
 
Haemophiliac? Even more reason to exercise!
 
But don’t think that haemophilia gets you off the hook for exercising either, as exercise is vital to keep the body and mind healthy, adds Medic8.com.
 
Simply stick to ‘safer’ forms of exercise that are less likely to result in injury, like swimming, walking, jogging, golf and cycling with a helmet and protective clothing to prevent injuries that result in excessive bleeding and bruising.
 
That’s all it takes.
 
If you know what to look for, you can still have good quality of life, even with haemophilia.
 



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