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The only thing that can actually get rid of a hangover is…

by , 03 September 2015

Ever since drinking alcohol became a thing, people have been searching for a way to go heavy on the pour, but light on the hangover. Unfortunately, according to two new drinking surveys, this search is probably futile.

One poll, conducted in Canada, concluded that if you drink to excess, you're going to have a hangover - no ifs, and or buts.

A second poll, conducted in the Netherlands, suggested that chasing your liquid poison with food or water ultimately does very little to improve the hangover experience. So what could cure a hangover? Keep reading to find out more about these new findings…

So what really causes a bad hangover?

“There’s a big difference between severity of hangovers and the symptoms people experience during hangover,” acknowledged Joris Verster, a member of both study teams. Verster is an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, pharmacology, and psychopharmacology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands.
 
“For example, some people have headaches, others are nauseous, others are just tired. Given this, there’s no clear definition of a hangover,” he said.
 
But one thing is clear, Verster said, “the more you drink, the more likely you are to get a hangover.”
 

What these two new studies found out about hangovers

The survey team pointed out that past research has suggested that between one-quarter to one-third of drinkers routinely attest to being immune from hangovers.

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But the Canadian survey found little evidence to support this notion…
 
Nearly 800 Canadian students subjectively discussed their single heaviest drinking experience during the previous month. Specifically, the students noted the amount of alcohol consumed and total time spent drinking. They indicated if they’d had a hangover, and, if so, to describe its severity.
 
While just over 30% said they didn’t have a hangover, only about 10 percent of those individuals actually had an estimated blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) that exceeded 0.08%, the study said. A BAC of 0.08 percent is the point at which American drivers are considered legally impaired, according to the US Governors Highway Safety Association.
 
What’s more, nearly 80% of the supposedly “hangover-free” group registered an estimated BAC below 0.10 percent, while just 2%t had a BAC of 0.20% or more, the study found.
 
Among the top-drinking group, almost nobody claimed to be hangover-free. And the investigators concluded that it was highly unlikely that any heavy drinker had truly managed to elude the consequences that come with pounding back one too many. 

 
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The second survey focused on 825 Dutch students who offered details concerning their latest bout of big drinking and the hangover that followed.
 
Drink totals were tallied, and investigators noted whether food and/or water was also consumed either right after drinking (before bedtime) or the following morning once a hangover was already underway.
 
While nearly 55% said they had some food before bed, there was no clinical difference seen in the way such drinkers rated the severity of their subsequent hangover when compared with those who didn’t eat immediately after drinking.
 
Similarly, the nearly 45% who said they downed a big breakfast the next day (and the 34 percent who consumed a lot of fatty foods) also saw little reduction in their hangover severity, the survey revealed.
 
Drinking water while consuming alcohol, or the following morning, also provided merely “modest” hangover relief, the study team found. And they concluded that food and water had no “relevant effect” on hangovers.
 
Nevertheless, Michael Bloomfield, a clinical lecturer in psychiatry at University College London and the Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Center in London, England, said more research is necessary to draw up final conclusions.
 

So… What can you actually do to remedy a hangover?

“I don’t think this is the final nail in the coffin with respect to studying hangovers,” he said. “Whilst we know that alcohol affects different chemicals in the body to make us feel lousy, we still aren’t entirely clear on exactly why it is we can feel so dreadful with a hangover,” Bloomfield added.
 
“At the moment, the best advice to avoid a hangover would be to drink less alcohol,” he suggested. “Everyone’s body deals with alcohol slightly differently so it would be very difficult to come up with a one-size-fits-all ‘hangover limit’ for drinking.”
 
Bloomfield also pointed out that if people can drink a lot without getting a hangover, it may be a sign that they are tolerant to the effects of alcohol. And, that could be a sign that they’re at risk of alcohol addiction. He said that if anyone is concerned about their alcohol use, they should speak with their family doctor or a psychiatrist.
 



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