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Surprise: Men aren't the top binge drinkers…

by , 22 May 2013

Binge drinking's seen as a ‘male thing'. That's why the BBC reports that a widow has warned of the dangers of binge drinking after her rugby fan husband fell into a river and died following an all-day drinking session. But research shows we should change our thinking of binge drinking, as a study shows that women in their twenties actually binge drink more alcohol than men! Read on to discover the recommended drinking limits for women and men.

 
 
Rugby fan Ben Thompson won hospitality tickets through his company to watch a Six Nations rugby game live with friends in Wales in February.
 
He began drinking just after 10am that morning, continued binge drinking throughout the day and later went missing… only to stagger into the River Ely, where his body was found in March, says TheBBC.
 
That’s why the UK’s on an ‘anti-binge drinking’ bent at the moment.
 
But it’s not just men who should be targeted.
 
Women actually binge drink more than men!
 
Because a new study by Harvard Medical School has found that college-age women actually binge drink more frequently than their male counterparts, which puts their health at even greater risk, says Metro.
 
According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, men should have no more than four drinks per day and 14 drinks per week. 
 
For women, this is limited to no more than three drinks per day or seven drinks per week. 
 
Here’s why recommended drinking limits are lower for women than for men…
 
Recommended drinking limits are lower for women than for men because women experience alcohol-related problems at lower levels of alcohol consumption than men. 
 
And it’s not just a pounding head and nausea from a lingering hangover you need to worry about.
 
Because binge drinking could lead to alcohol poisoning, liver damage or even death, says FSPHealth
 
Now, it’s been found that binge drinking just once a week also increases your risk of developing Type II diabetes, says MedicalDaily.
 
So cut down on the amount of alcohol you’re drinking each week – it could just save your life.
 



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