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Move over acai berries - there's a new superfruit in town!

by , 10 July 2015

If you've ever visited any South Asian counties, you might've already heard of this delicious, exotic fruit. If not, this might be new to you…

I'm talking about the pitaya AKA the dragon fruit. Sorry acai berries - you've had your time in the spotlight - this is the new superfruit!

This magenta-hued fruit has quickly become a staple in Central American diets - and will probably make its way around the rest of the world soon. Read on to find out more about it.

What makes dragon fruit so special

Aside from its good looks (that colour!), dragon fruit is loaded with nutrients. While supermarkets in South Africa don’t sell the whole fruit yet, some health stores sell it in frozen form. And it’s just as beneficial for you in that way…
 
One 100 g packet of dragon fruit, for example, is a brilliant source of fibre and magnesium. It also lends vitamin C, iron and B vitamins. All for just 60 calories!


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The best ways to consume dragon fruit

As I said, it can be tough to find in this country. But I’ve seen it in some juice bars. I’ve also seen it in frozen and dried form in some health stores. If you’re lucky enough to find it, get your hands on it!
 
Dragon fruit is perfect for almost any fruit smoothie or smoothie bowl recipe. But you can also use it in oatmeal or salads.
 
Despite its wild looks, the taste of this fruit is actually mild, lightly sweet and a tad tart.
 



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