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Low cholesterol levels have been linked to cancer, stroke and depression: Use this natural solution to boost your levels

by , 13 May 2013

While much more attention is given to the dangers of high cholesterol, there are also health dangers associated with low cholesterol levels. In fact, low serum levels of cholesterol can increase your risk of cancer, stroke and depression. Read on to discover what Dr Jonathan Wright of Nutrition & Healing suggests you should do to reduce your risk of fatal illnesses.

“Keeping total cholesterol levels below 200 mg/dL and your bad cholesterol levels below 100 mg/dL are optimal and can reduce your risk for heart disease,” says Health Discovery.com.

But can you go too low?

While it's well known that high cholesterol levels are linked to clogged arteries, heart disease and an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, “some controversial studies show a correlation between low cholesterol levels and an increased risk for non-coronary deaths,” writes Health Discovery.com.

Luckily Dr Wright has a solution...

Use manganese to boost your cholesterol levels

“I advise patients to take the few effective measures known to raise serum cholesterol, starting with manganese,” says Dr Wright.
Dr Wright cautions that although he hasn’t found it effective in raising serum cholesterol to the normal range in every patient who tries it, manganese is at least partially effective in more than 50% of cases.

What’s the dosage?

His usual recommendation is to take 50mg of manganese citrate once or twice daily. But, when your cholesterol levels are back up within a normal range, you should reduce the dosage to 10 mg to 15 mg once daily

There you have it! Using manganese will help lower your cholesterol levels and reduce your risk of fatal illnesses like cancer and stroke.

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