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Could fatty foods be making you high?

by , 22 July 2013

If you've ever wondered why it's so hard to stay away from fatty foods, a recent study may just have the answer for you: The study shows that eating fatty foods triggers the release of marijuana-like chemicals called endocannabinoids. Read on to find out why this could be bad for you.

Believe it or not, fatty foods could be making you high.

A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the drug-like chemicals that you release when eating fatty treats triggers a feeling that only serves to further encourage you to over eat as you seek out a return to the ‘high.’

Researchers also found that only fatty foods had the effect. Sugary and high-protein foods didn’t leave eaters with the high feeling.

Here’s why you should cut your fat intake

According to Nutrition & Healing, these endocannabinoids set off reactions in your brain that reduce feelings of pain and anxiety.

Researchers say this chemical signaling plays an important role in regulating fat intake. And they see this as a new target for antiobesity drugs. They’d like to block reception of the chemical, thereby breaking the fatty food cycle.

While researchers work on this, there’s a better–natural–answer to cutting your fat intake and stimulating feel good chemicals.

Do this to cut your fat intake and stimulate those feel good chemicals

You can stimulate the release of feel-good endocannabinoids by getting on your bike or running briskly for an hour or so. You’ll get the same ‘floaty’ feeling of well-being without the calories. This is also known as the classic ‘runner’s high.’

Another option would be to limit your fat intake. The last thing you want is to get addicted to fatty treats.






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