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Butterbur: The herbal remedy that could cut your migraines in half

by , 04 March 2013

Up to one in five employees at the average South African company suffers from acute or chronic migraines impair their ability to do their jobs efficiently and effectively. That's hardly surprising when you consider that statistics show about 6% of men and 18% of women suffer from migraines. And they can be caused by anything from food allergies to hormones and even the weather. But regardless what your migraine trigger is, there's a herb you can use to reduce their occurrence by more than half. Read on for details…

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If you’ve never had a migraine, you probably think they’re just a very bad headache.

But ask any migraine sufferer and they’ll tell you horror stories of limb tingling, nausea and vision loss that goes on for hours – sometimes days – at a time.

“For most people, taming their migraines is an ongoing series of trial and error events using various medications and stress-reduction therapies,” reports Life Extension magazine.

But if you suffer from migraines there’s finally good news. Research has emerged that a little-known herb could help cut your them in half.

Introducing the herd that halves headaches and migraines

“What’s the herb?” you ask.

It’s butterbur.

In a study published in the Journal Neurology, “a group of 245 migraine sufferers were given a 75mg dose of butterbur or a placebo,” explains Dr Jonathan Wright of Nutrition and Healing.

“Participants, who had two to six migraines per month in the three months prior to the study, took the butterbur or placebo twice daily for four months. At the end of the study, those taking the butterbur experienced a 48% reduction in headache frequency,” Dr Wright adds.

How does it work?

Well, according to Life Extension magazinebutterbur’s headache-preventive capabilities likely stem from its anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic (muscle-relaxant) effects. It contains active components known as isopetasin, oxopetasin, and petasin, which induce smooth muscle relaxation, particularly in cerebral blood vessel walls.”

That’s great news for migraine sufferers.

But before you rush out to try it, don’t forget to work with a skilled natural health physician when beginning any supplement or herbal regimen, warns Dr Wright. To find a doctor in your area, contact the South African Society of Integrated Medicine here.




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