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Are you a smoker? Discover fruits and vegetables that can help reduce your risk of lung cancer

by , 30 April 2013

Making the decision to quit smoking is one of the most rewarding things you can do for your health and well being. But it's also one of the toughest things you can do. If you're struggling to kick the habit, in the meantime, there are some common vegetables and fruits that could help protect you against lung cancer. Read on to find out what these vegetables are…

It’s without a doubt that the best thing you could do for your health as a smoker is quit smoking, but if you’re battling to kick the habit, your body will need all the support it can get in the meantime.

Luckily, you don’t have to look further than your favourite fruits and vegetables.

A study conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) found that smokers who eat three servings of fruits and vegetables per day and drink tea green or black tea have less risk of developing the potentially deadly disease than those who ate less produce and didn’t drink tea.

Help reduce your lung cancer risk with these fruits and vegetables if you smoke

Researchers “credited three particular flavonoids — catechin, kaempferol, and quercitin —with the biggest protective benefits,” writes Amanda Ross in Nutrition & Healing.

So which fruits and vegetables should you be eating if you smoke?

Catechin is found in strawberries and green and black tea; kaempferol is found in Brussels sprouts and apples; and quercitin is found in beans, onions and also in apples.

Besides offering you added protection against lung cancer, these foods also come with another bonus. “They aren’t ones associated with weight gain, which is the number one fear many smokers cite about quitting,” writes Ross.

Although this study looked only at current smokers, imagine the added protection you’ll be getting if you incorporate these foods into your diet while you’re quitting and afterwards.

Making these fruits and vegetables part of your diet, you can reduce your lung cancer risk while you battle to kick the habit.



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