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American study reveals that cholesterol-lowering medication can improve erectile dysfunction by 25% - so should you ask your doctor to put you on statins?

by , 20 February 2017
American study reveals that cholesterol-lowering medication can improve erectile dysfunction by 25% - so should you ask your doctor to put you on statins?
When you think of erectile dysfunction, Viagra is likely the only treatment that comes to mind. However, thanks to modern day science, this common disorder that can make even the bravest man weak at the knees, is more treatable than ever!

If you think that erectile dysfunction means the end of your sex life, think again. And, no, the “little blue pill” isn't your only option if you want to re-ignite your bedroom explosion!

A new study published in the Journal of Sexual Medication has found that cholesterol-lowering medication, known as statin drugs, is another successful treatment for erectile dysfunction. In fact, this type of medication may improve the condition by as much as 25%! Here's the full scoop...

American researchers find that cholesterol-lowering drugs can significantly improve erectile dysfunction

The study was led by lead investigator John B Kostis. In addition to being published in the journal, the findings were also presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session.
 
To reach their findings, Kostis and his colleagues looked at men with both high cholesterol and erectile dysfunction. They found that men who took statins improved their erectile dysfunction by as much as 25%.
 
“The increase in erectile function scores with satins was approximately one-third to one-half of what has been reported with drugs like Viagra, Cialis or Levitra,” Kostis reported. 
 
Doctors said that they hope this new discovery will help motivate men with both high cholesterol and erectile dysfunction to be more consistent with taking their cholesterol-lowering medication.


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Experts believe that statins improve erectile dysfunction by helping blood vessels dilate

Just how to statins help with erectile dysfunction though? Experts suggest that the cause of their success with erectile problems lie in their ability to help blood vessels dilate properly. When blood vessels dilate, vascular flow to the male genitals improves. Blood vessel dilation is often restricted in men with erectile dysfunction.
 
So should you run to your doctor and ask to be put on statins? If you’re healthy, no. If you suffer from high cholesterol, then yes. As already mentioned, doctors are hoping that this new finding encourages men with high cholesterol to take their cholesterol-lowering medication more regularly, as many men who’re prescribed statins take lower doses than the prescribed amount or stop taking the drugs altogether. This is dangerous as leaving high cholesterol untreated can seriously boost risk of heart disease.
 
“For men with erectile dysfunction who need statins to control cholesterol, this may be an extra benefit,” concluded Kostis, who believes that further research is necessary before we can make a definite link between cholesterol-lowering medication and erectile dysfunction.
 
Apart from high cholesterol, other common causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, depression, stress and smoking. If you’re experiencing this common condition that affects approximately 18 to 30 million men and is most prevalent in those over age 40, you should consult your doctor to discuss treatment options.



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