HomeHome SearchSearch MenuMenu Our productsOur products Ask an ExpertAsk an Expert

Stress and blood sugar levels: What diabetics need to know

by , 01 December 2017
Stress and blood sugar levels: What diabetics need to know
For most people, stress is simply annoying. If you have diabetes, it can be dangerous. That's because your blood sugar levels rise when your stress levels are high.

When you're under stress, you may need to take more insulin or other medications to stabilise your blood sugar levels. Being sick or physically injured can do the same. And your response to stress can make things even worse…

For example, if you skip meals, eat poorly or neglect exercise, your blood sugar levels may became too high or too low. For everything else you need to know about the effects of stress on your blood sugar levels, read on.

If you’re under stress, you may need to take more insulin to correct your blood sugar levels

There’s a myth out there that your food choices is the only factor that affects your blood sugar levels. However, there are actually a number of other factors that also play a role, such as stress, says Richard Hellman, MD, former president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.
 
He uses the example of a schoolteacher who takes insulin at breakfast and then has a morning meeting with a difficult co-worker. “That person will have, in many cases, a higher than normal glucose level at that time. Only part of it is due to what they ate,” Dr Hellman explains. “Another part of it is due to the fact that their hormones are churning out adrenaline and other stress hormones.”
 
That means if you’re under stress, you may need to take more insulin to correct your blood sugar levels. If you change your behaviour, you may need to take less.

***

Blood sugar worries? 
Get ready to sigh with sweet relief!
 
When this research first crossed my desk I couldn’t believe it!
 
The latest blood sugar science shows that your body’s own safety mechanism is why your current blood sugar solution may be selling you short.
 
In fact, this research confirms that targeting only your body’s natural insulin and your pancreas to conquer blood sugar is like trying to douse a forest fire with a glass of water.
 
But this research has also led to some really exciting news for you—a breakthrough in blood sugar science that no one saw coming.
 
Get ready to sigh with sweet relief!

***
 

Your lifestyle choices can also affect your blood sugar levels

Of course, stress isn’t the only factor that influences your blood sugar levels. Skipping meals and making poor food choices can have the same effect, notes Susan Guzman, PhD, senior psychologist with the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in the United States.
 
“I think the bigger problem with stress is that you stop making time for exercise, you stop making time to test your blood sugar regularly, you stop making time for meal planning,” Guzman says. The best way to break this cycle and keep your blood sugar levels in check is to take small steps – think a 15-minute walk in the middle of your day.

Vote article

Stress and blood sugar levels: What diabetics need to know
Rating:
Note: 5 of 1 vote

Related articles





Related articles


Watch And Learn



Related Products

Resources