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Treating brain cancer could be as simple as combining medications...

by , 19 June 2017
Treating brain cancer could be as simple as combining medications...
A recent study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered that the process of combining medications may help treat brain cancer and tumours.

Their findings, which they published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, demonstrated that a combination of medications traditionally used to separately treat arthritis and lung cancer can destroy glioblastoma - a brain tumour that is difficult to treat and lethal to most patients in little over a year - in mice. Keep reading for the full story...

Researchers find a potentially ground-breaking treatment for the most lethal type of brain cancer...

Glioblastoma is the most common – not to mention lethal – type of brain cancer. What’s more, it accounts for about 17% of malignant brain tumours.
 
Researchers behind this study said the disease aggressively spreads through the brain and can prove fatal within a few short months. That said, there are treatments that can help patients survive for more than a year.
 
“This could be a ground-breaking treatment,” Amyn Habib, a member of UT Southwestern’s Peter O’Donnell Jr Brain Institute and the Harold C Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, said about the findings. “If it works in patients, then it will be an important advance.”

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The medications they combined to treat the cancer are approved by the FDA

The researchers found that the combination of the two medications disables two proteins that are responsible for helping cancer cells survive, providing a therapy that UT Southwestern Medical Center is working to fast track for clinical use.
 
The medications they used to disable the proteins are already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including TNF inhibitors used to treat arthritis and other rheumatologic conditions.
 
“This is a terrific example of research that can be relatively quickly carried into the clinic,” Habib said.
 
The researchers said their findings answer a decades-old question of why a treatment that disables a protein common in various cancer has been effective in some forms of lung and colon cancer, but not in brain cancer.



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