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Here's how sitting more than 6 hours a day almost doubles your risk of ovarian cancer

by , 12 August 2015

Sitting for a long time is just not good for your.

I mean, when a Forbes Magazine cover screams, “Sitting is the new smoking!” it says everything.

And for women, it means ovarian cancer.

So, if you think getting your work done without taking as much as a loo break makes you dedicated, it's actually just making you sick.

Read more below to find out about a few simple changes you can make today to lower your odds of getting ovarian cancer…

Print out my article and walk around the office as you read it…

 
One of the simplest ways to lower your risk of getting ovarian cancer because of sitting, is to get up and walk around more.
 
It seems logical, right?
 
But how many times do you pick up the phone to chat to a colleague who is just a few steps away? Or do you conveniently have a large water bottle or tall flask of coffee on your desk so you don’t have to get up?
 
The impact on your body is horrendous, and what’s worse, is you don’t even realise it.
 
The recent conclusion of a long-term study by the American Cancer Society says you ovarian cancer risk soars to 43% because of it…
 
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16 years of evidence can’t be wrong…

 
Researchers for the American Cancer Society collected data from more than 77,000 women for 16 years. Every few months they asked the women to complete a questionnaire about their habits, especially how long they sat for each day.
 
None of the women had cancer at the start of the study, but by the end, so many of them were dealing with the devastating effects of ovarian cancer.
 
When the researchers took a closer look as to why, they found it was the women who sat more than 6 hours a day that were the most affected.
 
And that’s why, starting today, I want you to implement just a few of these easy tasks into your work routine so you aren’t one of the 43% who develop ovarian cancer.
 
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Implement just three out of these eight tasks into your every day routine to ensure you move enough to prevent ovarian cancer

 
1.       Get up to get a glass of water, tea or coffee every hour.
2.       Download an App onto your phone to remind you to move. Stand Up!, StandApp and Move are some of the popular choices.
3.       Walk over to your colleagues to speak to them instead of using the phone or email.
4.       Park in a parking bay that’s furthest from your office door.
5.       Go for a short walk during your lunch break.
6.       Stand up and tidy your desk, or stand while filing or talking on the phone.
7.       Take the stairs wherever you can.
8.       Stretch while you’re at your desk. Simply raise your arms above your head and take a deep breath, and stretch your legs and change position on your seat.
 
As long as you’re getting more blood flowing through your body, your risk of ovarian cancer decreases significantly.
 
And it’s an easy way to improve your overall health the natural way. 

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